Category Archives: Food & Drinks

CFER Labs has collaborated with Why Not Soda on the technical development of their first flavour, Lemon’Mate. We had the chance to interview Nils Schwentkowsi (NS), the company co-founder and business manager, and ask him some questions about the company’s vision, business model and, also, his feedback about the collaboration with CFER Labs.

CFER: So the market for craft sodas in Germany is well established, but in Portugal you found that was a big gap. Can you tell us a little bit more how “why not soda” started and how consumers presently perceive the brand?

NS: I saw the soft drink market in Germany changing massively during the last 20 years. Until I went to university there were only the big brands like Coca Cola and Pepsi, but then one, two, three alternative producers appeared on the market with more sophisticated ways of production, with more interesting flavors or just more interesting stories to tell. And now the shelves in regular supermarkets are full of different options. My wife and I we both became soda-fans, because the soda had less and less sugar and became more and more natural with new, interesting flavors.

We have been in Portugal many times before we moved here. We love the country, its people, its nature. But one thing we were missing and we could not find: There were no real alternative sodas on the market. Only these artificial ones full of sugar. So we decided: why not make better sodas here in Portugal – interesting flavors with only natural ingredients, less sugar, bio-certified. And so we did. We left our career, quit our secure jobs and told our friends that we would move to Portugal with our two little daughters to become soda producers without even speaking the language. You can imagine that most of them stared at us saying: why? Well, you know our answer: why not! We believe that one should constantly look for new experiences. They do not necessarily have to be as life-changing as ours. But new experiences make you grow personally and make you feel alive. This is also what we want to transport with our brand and our story.

So, we had a slight feeling how to start without having any experience in this sector. We developed the recipe for our first flavor in the kitchen and then went to professionals to help us to have the right recipe for production. We found suppliers and very important a place to bottle here in Portugal, the fantastic guys from Cerveja Vadia. In June 2018 we produced our first batch, in August already the second. The feedback we received was super positive. Customers loved the refreshing and natural taste and the fact that it had less sugar.

In the end of 2018 we won a StartUp-Accelerator by Startup Lisbon and since then we are constantly growing in numbers of clients and sales. We won clients from the Algarve to the north and were listed in Go Natural as well as Continentes Innovation Food Lab. During the Startup Programm we also met the CEO of Delta Cafes, Rui Miguel Nabeiro. He liked our spirit, speed and most importantly the product. So we decided to run a sales trial in 2019. And now we started working together on a regular basis and they will start to distribute our products. We feel very just very honored to experience all of this – and of course motivated to keep on going. We will launch two more flavors in March and will start a whole family of Craft Soda, which we plan to constantly grow over the next years.

CFER: How do you feel the craft soda market will evolve over the next years both in Portugal as in Europe?

NS: Customers are looking for more “better-for-you-options”. They are more conscious about what they consume, but not in an extremist way. They still want to enjoy their lives. And we can also see a tendency towards the identification with local brands. Experience is what consumers are looking for in new products – especially the younger Generations. We deliver the right product for these demands. We use only natural, high quality ingredients, lower sugar and of course bio-certified. We produce in Portugal and we give fruits that everyone know and interesting twist in flavor for new taste experiences.

In northern Europe craft soda or alternative soft drinks are already a big thing and we are the first ones to bring this trend to Portugal. Well, the big player will always play a dominant role, but there is room for smaller producers to position themselves on the market. But most importantly, besides all market potential, for us it is just a lot of fun to develop, produce and sell soda. It is a product with a good spirit. We love it.

The brand has started with a single refreshing flavour, Lemon’Mate, which is made with bio-certified, high quality ingredients. in marketeer.sapo.pt

CFER: As a research and innovation company, CFER is helping brands like Why Not reaching the market with even more innovative foods and beverages, while supporting their technical development. Could you describe us the importance of CFER as a technical partner during your trajectory up so far?

NS: As said before, we had help of professionals to make our ideas and recipes ready for production, because making soda in the kitchen is not the same as producing millions of bottles. Of course we are not there yet, but soon, of course. When we arrived here in Portugal we needed someone here, we could challenge our new ideas with, do adjustments to existing recipes, try new ingredients from new suppliers our just talk about questions of production processes. Craft soda making is constant work in progress, because you have to come up with new ideas and make your business better and better. So, we were looking for a partner we could exactly do all these things with. In CFER and especially in you, Daniel, we found a guy who knows what he is doing and we enjoyed running the first smaller project. We can recommend your service for young companies who want to do the next step, but also for bigger fishes, because you guys also have some good ideas.

CFER: As a F&B start-up founder competing on a global, demanding market, how important do you consider product innovation to be in order to gain competitive advantage over similar products?

NS: The interesting aspect about craft soda is that you always have to come up with new flavors – may they stay in your portfolio or just be a seasonal edition. It is like with the craft beers. Go to a Taproom, it is full of interesting references. As a craft soda producer, I feel with soda it is the same. The creative, the innovative win.

The collaboration with CFER Labs has helped the company to improve the first flavour of Why Not, Lemon’Mate. in nit.pt

CFER: How do you see your brand expanding in the next five years? Are there any strategic, international markets for “why not soda”?

NS: Of course, we have our strategic plan and there are interesting markets, but first we need to make our homework here in Portugal and work hard. If you can make it here, you can make it everywhere. We want to win the Portuguese for our soda experience.

CFER: Many thanks for your time. We wish prosperous growth for your business and we are looking forward for many more exciting “why not soda” flavors!

NS: Live long and prosper – drink more organic craft soda made in Portugal, why not!

Cover picture: in Dinheiro Vivo (Reinaldo Rodrigues/Global imagens)

As most of the foods we consume today, the product consists not only in the edible part but also in the packaging. In the immense world of packaging, the most used material is plastic, due to its good mechanical properties, flexibility, low weight and cheap cost of production. A recent study shows that the global production of plastics was raised from 2 million tons in the 1950’s to 348 million tones in 2017 and 359 million tons in 2018(1). However, in all stages of plastic’s lifetime, from extraction to recycling, a great amount of greenhouse gases are produced. While these gas emissions aren’t the only problem related to plastics, one of the biggest issues are the micro and nano plastics freed during its degradation in natural environment. These microplastics harden the CO2 absorption from the oceans, promoting an atmospheric CO2 regulation imbalance, ultimately climbing the food chain and potentially affecting the human health.

How can we prevent plastic misuse?

There are three possible destinies for all the waste we deposit in the plastic recycling container:

  • Being actually recycled, renewing packages and other useful sub-products;
  • Being incinerated for energy reuse;
  • Being dumped in a landfill.

Of course, the landfills are the worst possible solution, and thus the most avoided one. A 2017 study(2) shows that in Europe are produced about 25 million tons of plastic, and of those 25 million, 39.5% were incinerated, 30.8% end up in a landfill and just 29.7% are really recycled. A promising method uses Polyethylene (PE) as a carbon source for the production of Carbon Nano Tubes (CNT’s) by a laboratorial technique called Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD).

What are carbon nanotubes? 

CNT’s are emerging as powerful, flexible and resistant semiconductors. Their industrial application will seriously upgrade solar cell’s yield in photovoltaic panels, the production of display devices like TV screens, touch screens, transistors and others, increasing lithium ion battery’s yield and much more(3)(4)(5).

Carbon atom’s bounds are very strong and for that reason the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes are also very strong, allowing future ropes and cables to be extremely strong, almost unbreakable.

Small fibers of nanotubes could be used as reinforcement agents of composite materials, increasing their resistance to traction or flexible forces.

How are CNT’s produced?

There are several ways to produce carbon nanotubes but the most promising method, in terms of scalability, is the method of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) (6).

On a controlled environment, little fragments of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) are chosen. Then, they are heated to temperatures between 600oC-1000oC (7) and they are mixed with a catalyst that reduces the boiling temperature of LDPE. Once boiling, the vapor is transferred to another chamber where the temperature is lower. This will force the vapor to condensate. In the presence of a catalyst like a sheet of graphene, the rich carbonaceous vapor slowly deposits its carbon atoms onto the graphene surface forming nanotubes.

However, the growth control of this structures is still very limited. It is hard to estimate what is going to be the length, width and direction of these tubes, and that is still a challenge that needs to be surpassed so that the full potential of carbon nanotubes can be put to use.

This method is presently only developed in a laboratorial enviroment, but it is the most likely to be scaled in a near future due to its lower applied temperatures. Other methods, like laser ablation, employ much higher temperatures and demanding conditions.

Carbon nanotubes can be the raw material needed for the production of innovative, highly resistant materials.

Other solutions 

Recent advances in bio-fabrication technologies have led several startups to grow exponentially over the last decade, some of them focusing in plastic replacement.

A great substitute of Polystyrene (PS) consists on the compaction of a specific species of mushrooms. It is almost equal to polystyrene, but biodegradable. It was developed by the American company Ecovative and early adopted as packaging solutions for Dell’s products, accommodating technologic products such as computers and accessories. It was later adopted by IKEA in 2016.

As replacement of ethylene, small seaweed-based plastic bubbles were developed, and these can be used to encapsulate every kind of sauce or stable liquid, like water or juice. Being an edible and biodegradable packaging solution, created by Notpla, many fast food chains and retail markets have adopted the invention.

There is still a lot to be done, especially regarding consumer education. General population needs to be educated and informed about what is happening around the world, what are the consequences of inaction, what are the conditions where food is produced and with critical thinking decide if the simple act of buying a specific food can be harmful for someone or something, somewhere on the other side of the world.

There’s a great need to fight ignorance and lack of reliable information, not only in poor countries but also in rich and developed ones. Many companies and public entities work daily to provide knowledge and information to the general public and CFER Labs is one of them.

Written by André Azevedo – https://www.linkedin.com/in/andr%C3%A9-azevedo-668064163/

Bibliography
(1) Shen, M., Huang, W., Chen, M., Song, B., Zeng, G., & Zhang, Y. (2020). (Micro)plastic crisis: Un-ignorable contribution to global greenhouse gas emissions and climate change. Journal of Cleaner Production, 254, 120138. https://doi.org/10.1016/J.JCLEPRO.2020.120138
(2) Ragaert, K., Delva, L., & Van Geem, K. (2017). Mechanical and chemical recycling of solid plastic waste. Waste Management, 69, 24–58. https://doi.org/10.1016/J.WASMAN.2017.07.044
(3) Grace, T., Shearer, C., Tune, D., Yu, L., Batmunkh, M., Biggs, M. J., … Shapter, J. G. (2017). Use of Carbon Nanotubes in Third-Generation Solar Cells. Industrial Applications of Carbon Nanotubes, 201–249. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-323- 41481-4.00008-3
(4) Jiang, K. (2017). Carbon Nanotubes for Displaying. Industrial Applications of Carbon Nanotubes, 101–127. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-323-41481-4.00004-6
(5) Fang, S., Shen, L., & Zhang, X. (2017). Application of Carbon Nanotubes in Lithium-Ion Batteries. Industrial Applications of Carbon Nanotubes, 251–276. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-323-41481-4.00009-5
(6) Wu, X., Mu, F., & Zhao, H. (2019). Recent progress in the synthesis of graphene/CNT composites and the energy-related applications. Journal of Materials Science & Technology. https://doi.org/10.1016/J.JMST.2019.05.063
(7) Ahmad, M., & Silva, S. R. P. (2020). Low temperature growth of carbon nanotubes – A review. Carbon, 158, 24–44. https://doi.org/10.1016/J.CARBON.2019.11.061

Kombuchawhaaat? If you have never heard about this beverage, do not be afraid! The pronunciation is easier than it looks and it is tastier than it sounds! Kombucha is a beverage that results from the fermentation of black or green tea leaves and cane sugar with several bacterial and yeast species – a Symbiotic Culture Of Bacteria and Yeast (SCOBY). Kombucha is one of the rising stars in the revival of specialty fermented beverages that has been taking place in the market over the last recent years.

The rise of fermented beverages, both in variety and production volume, has been defined as one of the most important trends in 2019 within the food beverage sector. To give you a more objective picture, the global fermented beverages market is expected to increase steadily until 2023, reaching 935 billion euros (in 2015 it was valued at 600 billion euros). The beverage consumers and the millennials generation in particular have a high interest on experiencing novel and unusual flavors together with different textures and the fermentation process can strongly influence those characteristics.

What makes kombucha unique

But why is Kombucha so special within the large variety of fermented beverages? Kombucha is a low-sugar tea-based fermented beverage with considerable levels of organic acids, vitamins and polyphenols, known for their health benefits. By adding fruit, herbs or flavors into this mixture you get a quite unique and refreshing beverage that is, most often, sparkling and non-/low-alcoholic. Kombucha can have a drier and/or tarter character like the traditional ciders or the “Brett” beers and the production of alcohol can also be boosted by adjusting the fermentation conditions (if alcohol is higher than 4.5% it is referred as Hard Kombucha). The explosion of flavors present in Kombucha can be quite overwhelming in the start due to its high acidity but quite addictive afterwards. The definition of Kombucha is quite broad and there is a great variety of flavors and profiles in the market at the moment, going from soft-drink like beverages with low sugar and high drinkability to more dry and acidic beverages that can be in the direction of sour beers or dry cider.

Tea and sugar are two central ingredients for the production of kombucha

One of the best parts about Kombucha is that you can produce it at home with a very limited amount of kitchen gear, no fancy equipment being needed.

There are several dedicated websites with infographics and videos that can be very helpful before you do your first Kombucha brew, where more detailed explanations about the gear required as well as recipes and how to find and get the SCOBY. In a simplistic way, the production process of kombucha requires two fermentation steps:

  • Primary fermentation:the mixture of yeast and bacterial species converts the sugar into ethanol and organic acids. At the start of the process, oxygen is present (aerobic conditions), which promotes the cell division of the yeast species and later conversion of sugar into ethanol and carbon dioxide (CO2). The type and proportion of yeast species varies from SCOBY to SCOBY but SaccharomycesBrettanomyces, Pichia and Hanseniaspora are some of the most common ones. When sugar is depleted, ethanol becomes the most abundant carbon source, which promotes the activity of the different bacterial species that will convert it into organic acids. Species belonging to the genus AcetobacterGluconobacter and Lactobacillus are the major responsible for the production of acetic acid, gluconic acid and glucuronic acid. Acetic acid, that gives vinegar aroma and taste, is normally the most abundant organic acid when the primary fermentation is finished. At the beginning of the process the SCOBY will be at the top of the flask and during the fermentation it starts to sink, forming a new SCOBY at the top. Thus, at the end of the primary fermentation you will have two SCOBYs that can be used for two new batches of Kombucha.
SCOBY – The Symbiotic Culture Of Bacteria and Yeast that is responsible for the formation of unique flavors and aromas in Kombucha (Image from BUCHI, www.buchi.com.au/)
  • Secondary fermentation: the Kombucha from the primary fermentation is filtered to remove the major particles and then flavored by adding fruit, juices, herbs, spices and/or others. The sugar addition from the flavoring step will promote the anaerobic fermentation of yeast, resulting in the formation of carbon dioxide (CO2) which naturally carbonates the final beverage. When this step is made directly in the bottle – bottle fermentation – it can be tricky since you need to calculate how much CO2 will be produced from the sugar added during flavoring. The first time you may get an over-carbonated beverage with too much fizz.

Even though there are many reports regarding the positive impact of Kombucha on the digestive system and gut health together with its action as anticarcinogenic, antihypertensive, antidiabetic, and hepatoprotective, it is important to note that currently, Kombucha cannot be granted with any official health claims. I believe that in a near future some concrete results from clinical studies will give a more accurate information regarding the active functionalities of Kombucha.

Kombucha flavoring step (image from ifoodreal, https:// ifoodreal.com/)

The Kombucha presence in the European market is still limited when comparing with the United States, where this fermented beverage can be found throughout the whole country. The implementation of Kombucha in Europe requires some more consumer education since it is a beverage with a unique and acquired taste, but it is clear that more and more people are becoming aware of its existence and benefits. Next time you see some Kombucha in a shop or pub, go for it and give it a try! Soon after there is a high chance that you will be planning your first brew of Kombucha at home.

Sources

https://www.globenewswire.com/news-release/2017/04/17/961353/0/en/Global-Fermented-Beverages-Market-2014-2016-2023-Launches-of-New-Products-are-Stimulating-the-Market-Growth.html
https://www.foodnavigator.com/Article/2018/05/04/There-is-a-mega-trend-around-fermentation-The-rising-star-of-fermented-foods
Coton, Monika, et al. “Unraveling microbial ecology of industrial-scale Kombucha fermentations by metabarcoding and culture-based methods.” FEMS microbiology ecology 93.5 (2017).
Professional Kombucha Brewers Workshop, Barcelona (2019).
Jayabalan, Rasu, et al. “A review on kombucha tea—microbiology, composition, fermentation, beneficial effects, toxicity, and tea fungus.” Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety 13.4 (2014): 538-550.
Dutta, Himjyoti, and Sanjib Kr Paul. “Kombucha Drink: Production, Quality, and Safety Aspects.” Production and Management of Beverages. Woodhead Publishing, 2019. 259-288.

CFER Labs is your partner in food and drinks R&D. Obtain your free of charge workplan by clicking here.

Bone broth is made by simmering animal bones and tissue for at least 8 hours with optional vegetables, herbs, spices and salt.

The health benefits of bone broth (or soup) have been long perceived, but only a decade ago was the remedial effect of bone broth scientifically evaluated. For instance, the generally believed curing effect of chicken soup against symptomatic upper respiratory tract infection has been found to follow from an increase in nasal mucus velocity or its mild anti-inflammatory effect.

More recently, bone broth has been increasingly recommended as part of the diets for gut and psychology syndrome (GAPS) patients, such as those with autism and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Brand owners and marketeers are supporting the growth of bone broth as a functional product by claiming that it can quell inflammation, speed healing, calm allergies, combat fatigue and promote satiety. These attributes could be attributed to broth’s protein, collagen, gelatin, essential and inessential aminoacids and minerals. Several media and academic references support the positive attributes of bone broth, as shown below:

The Nourished Kitchen – Bone broths are extraordinarily rich in protein, and can be a source of minerals as well. Glycine supports the bodies detoxification process and is used in the synthesis of hemoglobin, bile salts and other naturally-occurring chemicals within the body. Glycine also supports digestion and the secretion of gastric acids. Proline, especially when paired with vitamin C, supports good skin health.

Kettle and Fire – Bones and connective tissue are storehouses for essential amino acids and minerals — which are lacking in many diets today. Bone broth is also an invaluable source of protein, collagen and gelatin.

Medical News Today – Drinking bone broth may be beneficial for the joints and digestive system, among other things. Bone broth is highly nutritious, may protect the joints, may help fight osteoarthritis, may help reduce inflammation and heal the gut, may aid sleep and may support weight loss.

Cognitune – Enhancement of weight loss and metabolism, with fantastic properties regarding detoxification, digestion and weight loss.

A 2017 research study included bone broth as part of a recommendable microbiome restoration procedure.

Brand owners and marketeers are supporting the growth of bone broth as a functional product by claiming that it can quell inflammation, speed healing, calm allergies, combat fatigue and promote satiety. However, the topic is controversial.

On a 2016 piece titled ‘Science Can’t Explain Why Everyone is Drinking Bone Broth’, Time Magazine claims that ‘there isn’t much research on bone broth to support—or refute—these health claims. But several experts on human digestion say the nutrients that supposedly make
bone broth special are not, in fact, all that unique.’ A recent australian research paper advises that ‘If the intake of collagen precursors is proven to support the synthesis of new collagen in vivo, it’s unlikely that bone broth can provide a consistently reliable source of key amino acids.’ More research is needed, and while no source claims its unhealthiness, bone broth seems to contain a fair concentration of protein and minerals, promoting satiety and a warmth feeling. However, it may not be delivering the remarkable nutrition that some entities are claiming, especially due to bioavailability issues and insuficient concentration of the key nutritional compounds for a superior level of functionality.

Evidences seem to suggest that the longer the cooking, the more gelatin and minerals are extracted, a key goal while producing bone broth. The extended cooking promotes the release of aminoacids from bones.

Production of bone broth

While any bone or ligament can be used, knuckles, chicken feet, and femur bones tend to contain the most collagen. Beef, chicken and fish are the most used animals for bone broth production. As with stock, bones are typically roasted first to improve the flavor of the bone
broth. The bones may contain a small amount of meat adhering to them. At the end of cooking, the bones should crumble when pressed lightly between the thumb and forefinger. While the bone broth is being prepared, proteinaceous foamy scum typically bubbles up at the
top of the pot. Removing it helps to clarify the broth and improve its flavor. At the end of the desired time of cooking, the bones and other debris are discarded and the remaining liquid can be filtered or strained for higher purity. After conditioning the final liquid in the fridge, the
natural fat from the broth is typically removed, yielding a brown coloured liquid with a turbid look. The final product is microbiologically unstable, so that a pasteurization/sterilization cycle will be needed to increase the shelf-life of commercial liquid bone broths. The pasteurized broth may display a shelf-life of over 2 years. Optionally, the broth may be dehydrated to a powdered form, allowing for its posterior reconstitution with boiling water.

A growing market for bone broth

According to figures from Global Market Insights, Inc, global broth market is projected to exceed USD 2.8 billion by 2024; according to a new research report by Global Market Insights, Inc. changing consumer preference towards animal-based stock as a protein source will drive broth market growth. Rising health consciousness and high disposable income will support the product penetration. Factors such as rapid urbanization and ageing population are anticipated to propel ready to drink broth market size.

North America broth market will witness growth over 4% up to 2024. High disposable income and trend of ready to eat food due to changing lifestyle will propel regional industry size. Increasing consumer consciousness regarding health benefits associated with stock
consumption over traditional soups will fuel product penetration. Asia Pacific broth market size accounted for over 15% of the industry share in 2016. The regional industry growth is attributed  to large consumer base and increasing spending on packaged food. Increasing working women population in the region is also likely to influence product demand. Development of multi outlet food channels will drive convenient buying of products thus, propelling regional industry growth.

Growing awareness regarding personal fitness among young and adults will fuel broth market size. Improved metabolism, bone strength and enhanced immunity are the key health benefits offered by the product. Increasing popularity of rich nutrient beverages to avoid dependency on medicines and health supplements will provide lucrative opportunities for the industry growth.

CFER Labs is your partner in food and drinks R&D. Obtain your free of charge workplan by clicking here.

Sources

D. Hsu, C. Lee, W. Tsai, and Y. Chien, “Essential and toxic metals in animal bone broths,” Food Nutr. Res., vol. 61, no. 1, p. 1347478, 2017.

L. K and H. J, “Microbiome restoration diet improves digestion, cognition and physical and emotional wellbeing.,” PLoS One, vol. 12, no. 6, 2017.

F. Seebohm, “The Tribal System of Wales,” 1904

https://www.cognitune.com/bone-broth-benefits/

The India Pale Ale (IPA) has become synonymous with craft beer itself. In a previous article I have introduced how the style emerged in the 18th century, and in this piece I will describe the brewing basics of this hop-forward, intense beer style from a personal point of view.

Adjusting the water as a first step

If you would also like to brew your own hop fever, here is how I do it. I start by adjusting the water, that, historically and technically speaking, plays a major role in IPA’s. From a personal point of view, I like to add enough calcium sulfate to the brewing water to bring the calcium to 200ppm and the sulfate to 400ppm, in order to get a clean bitterness from the hops. If you are making a NEIPA, you may prefer using more calcium chloride than calcium sulfate to bring your calcium up, in a reason of 1/2. In mashing terms, I favour a more fermentable wort but I still look for a dash of sweetness and some creaminess in the final product, so I always aim for temperatures below 65ºC (149ºF).

The grist, fermentation profile and hops

Following with the grist, some brewers use pils as their base malts, but pale ale malt is much more traditional, both in English and American styles. The optional use of toasted or crystal malts may bring some complexity and depth of aroma, but generally make a small portion of the grist. My personal touch is to use a small amount of Golden Promise malt, that is similar to Maris Otter, but a little softer and creamier.

I want my fermentation profile to be neutral to lightly fruity, so I use an highly attenuative ale yeast and let to ferment between 18 and 22ºC (64ºF – 72ºF). The best temperature is however 19.5ºC (67ºF), as we can extract the ideal concentration of apple, peach and pear esters without excessive fermentation derived flavour.

Finally, the hops. Here is where the world of IPA’s gets really exciting – and bitter. Hops bring aroma, bitterness and tons of flavour, but different applications bring different results. If you are brewing a hop forward IPA, American style, you should go for American or New World hops, such as Cascade, Citra or Nelson Sauvin, where you will find an abundance of tropical, citrus or piney aromas. Here, you can play with generous late hop additions, dry hopping or hopinating the pouring beer. If you are brewing an English style IPA, with a floral-spicy-peppery-grassy bouquet, you may want to use classic hops such as Golding, concentrating its use in the beginning of the boil and adding some as dry hops to spice things up.

I do like to add a handful of hops in the whirlpool and then dry hopping the beer, which I believe to be the most interesting way to hop IPA’s. There is a lot to choose from.

Hops have been beer’s best friend for a long time, and IPA’s may well be the pinnacle of that friendship. The world has gotten addicted to them, and there is no turning back from this hoppy journey.

What is your favourite IPA and hop variety? Let us know!

Happy IPA’s!

CFER Labs is your partner in food and drinks R&D. Obtain your free of charge workplan by clicking here.

Sources

BARRACHINA, Albert (2016). cervesaencatala.blogspot.com

HUXLEY, Steve (2006). Poesía líquida. Trea.

BJCP (2015). www.bjcp.org